About the October Sun songs

The songs on the October Sun EP all have strong ‘singalongable’ hooks in them that can pop back into your mind pleasurably at any time of the day. “I think there is a certain ‘flavour’ to living here in the south west of Western Australia” says Dave Meek, “Each song has its own variation of what has been called ‘sunshine pop’”.

 SINGING MY SONG has some great lower harmonies dubbed the ‘Johnny Cash’ lines by Angie because of the way that great singer would add almost drone like lower vocal parts to a lot of his songs. Angie sings such a lower harmony all the way through the song with three-part harmonies in the choruses, and a lot of the parts are first takes. An acoustic guitar part trundles along nicely right from the start of the song tying everything together, whilst on top of this various interesting guitar parts add different flavours between verse and chorus. 

FEELING GOOD leaves you feeling just that! The rhythmic interplay between the vocal and the main verse guitar part which is continually changing encourages repeated listening. The saxophone continues that relationship with the guitar through the middle eight before being taken up again by the vocal. The strong choruses leave a satisfying feeling of everything rounding up nicely. Most vocal parts are first takes here too! 

SUNSHINE BLUE is about as laid back as you can get. Visions of summer loving are conjured up by each bouncing note. There is a rhythmic complexity to the choruses that defies you to stop tapping your foot. John’s breathy singing through the choruses leaves the listener in no doubt as to the loving feelings being portrayed through the whole song. 

COMING BACK TO YOU has a great country feel to it with simple instrumentation and Angie’s country singing background shining through. Super self-harmonies with a lovely movement between thirds and fifths keep things interesting right through the song. Delay throws and ‘telephone’ eq effects add interesting elements and the ‘violin’ guitar part partnered up with the ubiquitous tremolo guitar adds something special from the first chorus right through to the end.